Sunday, September 25, 2022

International Scientific Group Of Applied Preventive Medicine I - Gap Vienna, Austria


About Current Issue:

“Bridge between Health and Social
Interventions in Era of Instability

 


Highlights:

 

CSW no. 5, vol. 13, 2022


 

Guest Editorial

 

Psychosocial and Educational Rehabilitation of Post-War Countries (Editorial)

DOI: 10.22359/cswhi_13_5_01

War conflict, its preparation, course and termination is a socially threatening continuum that requires the commitment and coordination of the entire society. Experiencing a war conflict leaves a significant impact on a person’s physical, psychological and social health, even long after the end of war operations. However, it is not only about individual problems and the subsequent individual efforts to solve them, but also about the whole of society. If the military conflict takes place in a culturally diversified environment, then post-war rehabilitation also requires respect for cultural diversity. Therefore, post-war reconstruction plans must include not only the solution to the psychosocial consequences of the war, but also the rehabilitation of the entire society, in which education has a key position.

The professional guarantee of the post-war recovery of the company requires the functional cooperation of experts from various fields. In addition to experts from the fields of finance, economy, construction, transport, and energy, representatives of helping professions have an important mission in the rehabilitation of post-war countries. Their importance is accentuated, for example, in the area of ​​identifying the impact of war on the socialization process and in eliminating the problems that war events left in it. The target category of the positive reconstruction of socialization processes in post-war countries is the restoration of humanism, solidarity, justice and social cohesion. These values ​​are part of the professional equipment of all helping professions. The participation of helping professionals in post-war rehabilitation is irreplaceable.

Scientists have an irreplaceable place in building the post-war world. Their task is not only a scientific reflection of the problems brought about by the military conflict and proposing solutions to these problems, but also the identification of preventive measures that would prevent a new war in the future. One of the key determinants of the emergence of prerequisites for war conflict is the existence of social tension and efforts to eliminate it through violent activities. Another prerequisite for the emergence of armed riots are long-term (sometimes also short-term) global, interstate, local, political, ethnic, or religious conflicts. The long-term inability or even reluctance to solve them on the part of social and political elites often develops into open armed conflicts with enormous economic but above all psychosocial consequences.

The existence of available psychosocial support during and after the end of the war conflict is an important condition for the psychosocial rehabilitation of post-war countries. Living and working in the post-war world creates all kinds of stressful situations. Their theoretical reflection and research are part of a social engagement that can bring about sustainable renewal and social functioning of post-war countries. The successful fulfillment of this challenge will be reflected in the functional social reintegration of all social groups. We could include children and youth, seniors, people with disabilities, or all residents of socially disadvantaged environments as social groups with a greater need to detect problems associated with their post-war reintegration.

The social reintegration of the inhabitants of post-war countries includes educational aspects as an immanent part. In order for education to make a positive contribution to the building of peaceful coexistence, it must identify and eliminate those aspects that could in the past, as well as potentially in the future, re-create foci of tension and the emergence of new ones, or old conflicts. Education, on the other hand, should be directed towards civil reconciliation as a necessary prerequisite for the post-war reconstruction of society. The challenge for educational policy makers as well as pedagogical workers in the mentioned context is to understand, explain and recommend changes in the system and content of education that would guarantee the peaceful nature of the educational process. The implication of critical thinking as a cross-sectional part of educational activities can become a transformative educational aspect from war to sustainable peaceful coexistence.

Psychosocial and educational rehabilitation of post-war countries should be based on the values ​​of peaceful coexistence, on evidence-based concepts and sustainable development. Post-war reintegration and rehabilitation therefore requires a long-term and comprehensive approach of the entire international community. The primary role of academic and scientific research workers in this process should be to “help with facts”, i.e. by providing objective, verifiable and justified scientific information, which, through its dissemination, will become a peace-building element in the stabilization of post-war countries.

Peter Jusko

Faculty of Education, Matej Bel University in Banska Bystrica, Slovak Republic

Pankojini Mulia

Department of Philosophy, Rajendra University, Bolangir, Odisha, India

 

References:

UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME (UNDP) Monthly report 5. 2022, Report. UN New York, 2022, pp.55

CLAUS MUSS, VLADIMIR KRCMERY, MONIKA GULASOVA, MICHAL OLHA, DANIEL WEST (2022) Collapse of Healthcare Providers-medical and Paramedical-healthcare Staff after last Three Years of Pandemics and War Conflicts In. Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention, No 5, Vol. 13, 2022.

MARIA KILIKOVA, VIERA HULKOVA, ANNA SABOVA (2022) Economic and Time-varying Consequences of Smoking Addiction among Nurses on Work Performance from the Aspect of Nursing Management In. Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention, No 5, Vol. 13, 2022.

TEREZIA FERTALOVA, IVETA ONDRIOVA, LIVIA HADASOVA (2022) Education of Formal Caregivers as a Predictor of the Quality of Institutional Care for Dementia Sufferers In. Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention, No 5, Vol. 13, 2022.

FABIAN RENGER, ATTILA CZIRFUSZ (2022) Aspects of the Level of Digitisation in Medical Care in Germany: Development of a Typology In. Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention, No 5, Vol. 13, 2022.

MICHAEL M. COSTELLO (2022) The Ukrainian War’s Impact on Food Security In. Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention, No 5, Vol. 13, 2022.

ZUZANA SERAFINOVA, KATARINA GAZDIKOVA, LUDMILA MROZOVA, PETER DZUPA (2022) Oral Health Status in Romani Children in Slovakia In. Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention, No 5, Vol. 13, 2022.

JOCHEN DINKEL, ANKA HANSEN, COSTIM BAUMGÄRTEL, MUSCHIK ALFRED, DANIEL DEACONU, MARTIN TVRDON, MONIKA GULASOVA, REZA AGHILI, ANDREAS MIRWALD (2022) Poor Dental Health as leading Risk Factor for noninfectious Diseases: One of major WHO concerns in 21 century (note) In. Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention, No 5, Vol. 13, 2022.

MONIKA BUTZ, SANDRA LEHMANN, JOHANNA PLISKE, ANJA PFEIFER, FRANZISKA MARIA THERESIA SCHARF, GERHARD SCHÖN, FABIAN RENGER, MONIKA GULASOVA, ZDENKA MACKOVA, KATARINA BUNDZELOVA, MARKETA VLADAROVA, VLASTIMIL KOZON, MILAN LULIAK,  IGOR KMIT, VLADIMIR KRCMERY, RAMMIYA GOTTSCHALK, ALEXANDRA ALTRAD, MARIANA MRAZOVA,    ERICH KALAWSKI, CLAUDI CATHARINA, MARIA HARDY, CATRIN GAUL, PETER GAUSS,  ARTUR MULLER,  KILIAN GROSSMANN (2022)  Physiotherapy  and  Psychosocial Rehabilitation in Postcovid and Postconflict Era: New Roles with same Staff? (Dispatch) In. Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention, No 5, Vol. 13, 2022.

JAROSLAVA PAVELKOVA, MONIKA SKODOVA, MILAN SCHAVEL (2022) The issue of Homeless young People as an Alternative of Life – Subjective Evaluation of Life on the Street In. Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention, No 5, Vol. 13, 2022.

ERIKA STANGOVA, JANA LEVICKA, ERIKA OCHABOVA, MICHAELA VACEKOVA (2022) The Benefit of Sport for People with Disabilities In. Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention, No 5, Vol. 13, 2022.

KEFAYAT SALMANIAN, FATEMEH SADAT MARSHIAN (2022) Prediction of Death Anxiety based on Body Image Concerns Mediated by Disease Perseption in Patients with Breast Cancer In. Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention, No 5, Vol. 13, 2022.

JAKUB RAFAL BARTOSZEWSKI, PETER JUSKO (2022) Bridges Between Social Work and Health Intervention In. Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention, No 5, Vol. 13, 2022.